Sunshine work?

newspaper articleHere is an interesting mystery! I came across this article in the August 11, 1924 issue of the Biddeford Daily Journal. Naturally the “M’Arthur” caught my eye, and I also knew the the Universalist Church was the McArthur family’s church…so what is this article about? I don’t know! So let’s put this out to the community, and see if they can answer the questions:

What was the “McArthur Class” at the Universalist church?

What was meant by the term “sunshine work”?

Go!

The Langlais Art Trail = art in your backyard

Who? BERNARD LANGLAIS (1921-1977) was an award-winning Maine artist and sculptor.

What? THE LANGLAIS ART TRAIL is, in essence, an art installation on a state-wide scale. A network of over 50 institutions in over 40 Maine communities allow the public to access and enjoy thousands of works created by this prolific and important Maine artist. Made possible by the Colby College Museum of Art and the Kohler Foundation, Inc.

When? FOREVER! The Langlais Art Trail is a permanent installation, and can be accessed whenever the host locations are open to the public. (Note: Some locations are free, some charge admission–best to check before you go.)

Where? ALL OVER MAINE. But your local Langlais Art Trail participant is Biddeford’s McArthur Library. The wild and whimsical pieces are on permanent display in our Children’s Room, to be enjoyed by art lovers of all ages!

Why? Because access to art makes us all richer people, and this trail gives many opportunities to access art for free. And not just any art, but works by an important and well-regarded artist, who did his own thing in his own way. Art historian Daniel Kany sums it thusly: “…it’s undeniable that the tremendously talented Langlais changed the Maine art landscape and that his late sculptures successfully achieve a raw and intentionally primitive power.”

To Learn More:

Boston Globe: Building an art trail through Maine

Portland Press Herald: The whole Bernard Langlais at the Colby Museum of Art

 

Bernard Langlais at the Colby College Museum of Art
Bernard Langlais at the Colby College Museum of Art

“Bernard Langlais at the Colby College Museum of Art”…  borrow from your local library, or purchase at your favorite local bookseller.

Your Family Stories: Learn, Preserve, Share, Repeat.

Picture2[Part II of McArthur Library’s Family History Month 2015 series.]

An important part of preserving your family treasures is to preserve the CONTEXT of those materials. How many of us have stacks of old photographs that were handed down, yet we have no idea who the people are in the pictures?

Unless there is someone or something in the background that may clue you in, not knowing the who/what/why of the things we keep negates the keeping of them in the first place. This should be reason enough for taking the time to label your images/files/other materials that don’t obviously tell you why they matter or who they are about.

New York Public Library’s Carmen Nigro gives us “Twenty Reasons Why You Should Write Your Family History

The resurgence in popularity of scrapbooking has had the great effect in that folks are not only labeling their images, they take the time to write a little blurb about them too, preserving the story that they want to tell about themselves and their loved ones. There are many ways today, via the Web, to connect with people to solve the mysteries of your family history. The use of social media allows us to interact with and share with friends and family anywhere in the world, and is a great way to figure out who that guy is in the picture with Great Aunt Edna from the 1978 family reunion. Numerous genealogy sites allow you to view the work of and connect with people whose family tree intersects with your own.

RESEARCH

PRESERVE + SHARE

Caring For Your Family Treasures

Picture2[Part I of McArthur Library’s Family History Month 2015 series.]

Today, caring for your family treasures means more than just keeping those old photos dust-free and wrapping grand-memere’s wedding veil in tissue paper. Not only do we have our analog family treasures, we have digital family treasures as well.

How about all those CD’s of digital photos in the back of your desk drawer? Or have you ever even made back-ups? Do you even have film negatives of your children, or are all of your photos on your computer, tablet or smartphone?

Also, with changing weather patterns and more extreme (read: unexpectedly bad) weather, are you prepared for an emergency or disaster? We know enough to leave the “stuff” and get ourselves to safety, but after the fact, what do you do to try and save what is left?

Read on for tools and techniques to help you keep your family treasures, of whatever kind, safe for the future.

PRESERVATION OF YOUR TANGIBLE KEEPSAKES (Mostly Library of Congress)

PRESERVATION OF YOUR DIGITAL/ELECTRONIC KEEPSAKES

DISASTER PREPAREDNESS + RECOVERY

 

October is (sorta) Family History Month!

Picture2Hey so October is unofficially the official month where we celebrate Family History in the U.S.A.! (Note of explanation: OK, so FHM is an official thing in Australia, and some states and municipalities in the U.S. have designated it as a permanent thing; the U.S. Senate declared October “Family History Month” in 2001 then again in 2005– but for those years only. That’s official enough for us, so we’ll just go with it.)

The important thing is this: MCARTHUR LIBRARY LOVES FAMILY HISTORY!

And we want you to know there are TONS of resources, both online and here in the library, for those interested in researching, preserving and sharing their own family history. 

So, in honor of Family History Month, we’ve got all kinds of things happening.

  • On the blog/social media sites: we will feature two upcoming posts with resources: “Caring For Your Family Treasures” and then “Sharing + Preserving Your Family Stories”.
  • In the library: we have several great programs that connect with the theme of Family History (check out the calendar of events), and there will also be a display upstairs of handouts and books available on Family History, Doing Genealogy, Caring For Family Treasures and Sharing + Preserving Your Family Stories.

 

Biddeford Cemetery Maps

greenwood-detail
Greenwood Cemetery (detail view), Biddeford, Maine.

[This post originally had a crazy title, because I was thrilled about finding these materials. I’ve since toned it down for ease of linking and reading. -Renee]

FOLKS.

Sorry. I know it is terrible netiquette to write in all caps, but I am so excited! While looking for an item that I had digitized, I stumbled across the MOST AMAZING FIND. Our glorious State of Maine has digitized maps of most of the cemeteries in Biddeford!

I KNOW, RIGHT!?

I believe that this now gives us all access to maps of all the large cemeteries in Biddeford. The State maps are WPA maps, and therefore dated, but something is better than nothing! And hopefully will help you get started. Click on the links below to access the maps. Enjoy!

WOODLAWN CEMETERY (*May show up as “Woodland” but will be fixed soon, it’s definitely Woodlawn.)
ST. MARY’S CEMETERY
ST. JOSEPH’S CEMETERY – MAP A
ST. JOSEPH’S CEMETERY – MAP B
ST. JOSEPH’S CEMETERY – MAP C
ST. JOSEPH’S CEMETERY – MAP D
ST. DEMETRIOS CEMETERY (Up to date, accessed via the Church website)
GREENWOOD CEMETERY – MAP A
GREENWOOD CEMETERY – MAP B
GREENWOOD CEMETERY – MAP C

JOURNAL TRIBUNE OBIT INDEX!

So you are trying to locate an obituary that may have appeared in the Journal Tribune? Did you know that if it is 1977 or later, you can search online??

Yes friends, it’s true! At Goodall Library’s Online Obituary Index, you can search for obituaries which would have appeared in the Journal Tribune from 1977 to Present (they have much more to offer as well, you can read all about it on their site). They have created a simple, user-friendly index where you can see the name and age of the deceased, as well as the newspaper and date on which their obit appeared. With that information, you can contact or visit the library of your choice to access a copy of the obituary.

[We here at McArthur Library would like to officially announce that we think the folks at L.B. Goodall Library in Sanford are, well, amazing.

Wayne and Garth

Thank you for your hard work! You guys ROCK!]